Campaigning Policy

The Academy of Management values elections that are free of active “politicking.” It is certainly appropriate to ask fellow members of the Academy for further information about a candidate you do not know. However, recommending candidates to others or actively campaigning is inappropriate and inconsistent with the way we operate as an association. This applies to general elections in the Academy as well as to division/interest group elections.

“Campaigning” within the Academy community is defined as attempting to influence the vote of others or promoting one candidate over another.

The Campaigning Policy is based on these principles:

  • All candidates are provided a level playing field. All candidates are presented to the membership in the same manner and given an equal opportunity to share their views or biographies for consideration. We seek to avoid elections in which campaigning may advantage one candidate over another.
  • Candidates are elected on the merits of their service and leadership ability rather than campaign resources.
  • Candidates are elected to lead the Academy or their division/interest group as a whole. We seek to avoid elections in which candidates represent coalitions campaigning on their behalf.
  • An open opportunity to be nominated and fairly considered for candidacy. The Academy Bylaws require open nominations and the construction of an appropriate slate, eliminating the need for self-promotion through campaigning.
  • Proper notification of members about the nomination process and the opening of elections. Announcements in newsletters, via email and on the website(s) are generated in a controlled manner, at reasonable intervals. We seek to avoid the undesirable prospect of candidates using electronic communication to inundate members with campaign material.

Examples of “campaigning” include but are not limited to:

  • Using Academy communication vehicles (e.g., listservs, newsletters, letterhead, distribution lists, AOM social networking platforms) for the purposes of endorsing specific candidates, soliciting votes on their behalf, or highlighting select candidates over others.
  • Using the Academy’s Member Directory or any other Academy directory (e.g., division /interest group roster, leadership directory, Connect@AOM communities, databases of authors, submitters) to build distributionlists for the purposes of campaigning.
  • Elected officers of the Academy or division/interest groups, or volunteers serving in appointed leadership positions endorsing candidates for office. Individuals holding such positions should also be aware that even when acting as individuals and not Academy representatives their title may be associated with a personal message despite intent to keep the two separate.
  • Using Academy funds for any activity that can be construed as campaigning.
  • Using Internet forums (e.g., Twitter, LinkedIn) for the purposes of endorsing specific candidates, soliciting votes on their behalf, or highlighting select candidates over others.
  • Using mailing lists (e.g., conference attendees, alumni groups) for the purposes of endorsing specific candidates, soliciting votes on their behalf, or highlighting select candidates over others.

The Academy will respond immediately when it learns of behavior that violates its Campaigning Policy. If corrective action (e.g., swift removal of social media posts) cannot be taken, candidates targeted by the influence attempt will be subject to violation procedures.

With regard to personal communication (e.g., lunchtime conversations or private email exchanges), the Academy acknowledges that friends and colleagues may share information about candidates. However, the Academy cautions that organized support within one’s personal or professional network intended to benefit a candidate is inconsistent with the spirit of our policy. These influence attempts are often viewed negatively by recipients, disadvantaging rather than aiding a candidate.

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